Category Archives: Quilts

Sewtopia – Chicago

 

Lindsey and me at Sewtopia

Lindsey and me at Sewtopia

My daughter, Lindsey, and I spent this past weekend at a sewing event called Sewtopia which was held in Chicago. Sewtopia is a 3 day sewing retreat for the online sewing community which occurs 2 times a year in different places around the country. During the Spring retreat the focus is on education and we had 2 fabulous instructors!

Latifa Sattir

Latifah Saffir and our sewing space at the Drake Hotel

Latifah Saffir traveled from Los Angeles to teach us her Molehill Quilt design which is all curved piecing. The curves are rather long and shallow and sewing them was a breeze after Latifah gave us tips and showed us how to sew them.

Lindsey arranging her Molehill blocks.

Lindsey arranging her Molehill blocks.

Did I mention that Lindsey is pregnant? 37 weeks pregnant to be exact. She lives in the Chicago area and so did not travel out of her usual stomping ground to attend this event which we had signed up for longer than 9 months ago. She and Latifah are both engineers and Lindsey could really appreciate the engineering that went into this quilt design.

xx

The final layout was decided.

The “Molehills” are all made and then some of them are cut and repositioned such that you end up with a rectangular quilt with straight edges made from all of those curves. You have to admit, that is some engineering! The name comes from a play on the saying about “not making mountains out of molehills”. These arcs are large (24″ wide) but not tall and so they are definitely more like molehills than mountains. This pattern is due to be released by Latifah later this week. Click here to go to her website.

IMG_6556

12 pieced Molehills = baby sized quilt

I did a fair amount of prep work for a Molehill quilt top of my own but wanted to spend more time figuring out a layout. I decided to help Lindsey construct her blocks so that we would get to the assembly while the instructor was still available to guide us. So . . . I don’t have any molehills of my own to show right now.

The following day we had Rita Hodge from Red Pepper Quilts who came all the way from Melbourne Australia to teach us how to piece Y seams to make the Kansas Dugout block. This block is sewn together using many, many, many, Y-seams. Did I say “many”? No exaggeration! This looks rather simple but was like putting a puzzle together.

My finished pillow top. 22" square. Each block is 5.5"

My finished pillow top. 22″ square. Each block is 5.5″

Lindsey's finished pillow top.

Lindsey’s finished pillow top.

DCMQG members with Rita Hodge (in the middle)

DCMQG members with Rita Hodge (in the middle)

The photo above is Rita’s quilt which is made up of 100 Kansas Dugout blocks. The templates for this block in 3 different sizes can be found on her website here and sewing directions are on her blog here.

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge fabrics

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge fabrics

The attendees of Sewtopia Chicago where issued a sewing challenge several weeks before the event. We were each sent 6 pieces of Michael Miller fabric and asked to create something quilted from them and bring it to the event to be shown all together and a few would be chosen by judges to win prizes.

Lindsey's entry into the Michail Miller Fabric Challenge.

Lindsey’s entry into the Michail Miller Fabric Challenge.

You could add other Michael Miller fabrics to your piece. Lindsey ended up making a pretty large quilt. We were sewing the binding down right before we went to the opening registration where we had to turn our items in.

Michael Miller Fabric Challenge

Some of the items entered into the Michael Miller Fabric Challenge

My entry was the Dragon Fly quilt pictured above (and below) with just a few of the the other entries.

xx

My quilt: “Well Dressed Dragonflies”

During lunch the day of the judging the attendees requested to vote on their favorite of the challenge items and the staff agreed and made it happen. Guess which quilt won “viewers choice”? Mine! I thought the dragonflies were pretty cute, but it sure was great to know others did too. It is a paper pieced pattern by Amy Friend that can be found here.

I do not have photos of the items that won the judging. If the Sewtopia people post photos of them later I will edit them in. The winner made a bag with amazing piecing and the words of the song “Over the Rainbow” free motion quilted into it. Second place was a fabric iconic Airstream trailer and 3rd place was an adorable rag doll.

There were many other wonderful sponsors for this event including Bernina who provided sewing machines for many of the participants, Pellon who provided rolls of batting and Reliable who provided irons. The organizers and staff were all truly amazing.

DCMQG Members

I had so much fun with these ladies!

I didn’t realize there would be other DC sewers at the event, but found that there were 3 others when I got there. Kristina on the left above has moved to Chicago is now a student at Northwestern University. Stephanie and Lauren flew in from DC for the event and it was such a pleasure to get to know them better.

To say that it was a wonderful weekend is such an understatement that it seems stupid to even say it. I sewed, I learned new things, I met new people and I was with my daughter who lives much too far away from me and who’s life is about to change forever. I feel as though I’m the luckiest woman alive. To top it off – I’m going to yet another retreat this coming weekend! Mid Atlantic MOD will be happening in Lancaster, PA and I will be there with many of my friends (some feel like daughters) from the DC Modern Quilt Guild. I can’t wait!

 

 

5 Comments

Filed under Quilts, Sewtopia, Uncategorized

Dinosaur Baby Quilt

 

My dinosaur quilt and the soon to be parents.

My dinosaur baby quilt and the soon-to-be parents.

My daughter and her husband are expecting a baby boy in May and I wanted to make him a special quilt. My daughter suggested that I make one with a dinosaur theme. After doing an online search for ideas I found this wonderful quilt by Daniel Rouse titled Hero’s nemesis.

Quilt by Daniel Rouse

Quilt by Daniel Rouse (photo used with his permission)

I basically copied what Daniel had done except I used different colors and a different dinosaur.

I started by making a quilt top out of Disappearing Nine Patch Blocks.

Disappearing Nine Patch quilt top.

Disappearing Nine Patch quilt top.

I wanted my quilt to have a triceratops on it. My family has spent a lot of time in Montana and the Museum of the Rockies has a wonderful display of triceratops skeletons. I found a wall decal of a triceratops skeleton that was the right size and traced around it.

Tracing around the wall decal.

Tracing around the wall decal.

I then made a patchwork of half square triangles that was somewhat larger than this tracing.

xx

I used the product Thangles to make my half square triangles and they made the process go pretty quickly. They come in all sizes, but I used the 1 1/2″ size.

Thangles

Thangles

I then layered the grey quilt top wrong side up with the teal patchwork on top also with the wrong side up and then put the traced skeleton on top of that.

xx

I pinned these pieces together well and brought it to my sewing machine and stitched around all of the skeleton pieces using my free motion foot.

I stitched around each bone in the skeleton.

I stitched around each bone in the skeleton (twice).

I ended up sewing around each piece twice. I just was not confident that one line of stitching would be secure enough. I am not the best at free motion stitching!

After tearing the paper off, I turned the piece around and started to trim the grey away from inside each of the bones which exposed the teal patchwork underneath.

This is the fun part!

This is the fun part!

As you can see, this is a raw edge reverse appliqué technique.

xx

IMG_6087

I used some leftover fabric and HSTs to piece together a fun backing.

The back.

The back.

I knew that the quilting would not be very obvious due to how busy the grey top is. I did some straight line quilting in sort of a sunshine fashion arising from the dinosaur and then some landscape type quilting underneath and bound it in teal.

Finished quilt.

Finished quilt.

This quilt was so much fun to make. Thank you to Daniel Rouse for sharing his process on his blog. He has made several quilts using a stencil technique and each one is absolutely amazing and unique!

My hope is that this quilt will keep my new grandson warm and secure for years to come. I can’t wait to meet him!

14 Comments

Filed under Quilts

Disappearing Nine Patch

Disappearing nine patch blocks

Disappearing nine patch blocks

I’m starting on a small quilt that I hope will have a lot of texture and decided to make “disappearing nine patch” blocks. This is an easy way to sew a block that looks rather complicated but isn’t that difficult to sew.

Sew a nine patch block together

Sew a nine patch block together

I randomly chose to use 3 inch square blocks to make my nine patches. I cut up as many gray or black and gray fabrics that I had and of course I had to purchase some more in order to have a great variety. That silvery dotted fabric is one I bought in Hawaii on a trip.

Cut the block down the middle both vertically and horizontally.

Cut the block down the middle both vertically and horizontally.

Once cut, I rotated the upper left and lower right pieces to put the small square at the outside corners.

I rotated 2 of the pieces.

I rotated two of the pieces.

You have other options at this point. You could orient these smaller blocks in any way you desire and you would get different looks.

Sewn together.

Sewn together.

The nice thing about the way I did these is that there is no fussing with lining up the seams to “nest” together except at the very center of the block. This may not seem like a big deal, but think about it. Every time two seams meet, it is desirable to have them ironed in different directions and this can get pretty complicated with this many seams.

Can you imagine sewing the block above by cutting out all of those pieces individually and piecing them together? It would take forever and be so inaccurate. At least if I did it, it would be.

xx

15 blocks on my design wall.

My finished blocks are 7 1/2″ square unfinished or will be 7″ square finished. I have 15 done and 33 left to go. If I lay them out with 6 blocks across and 8 blocks down, the finished quilt will be 42 X 56″ which I’m told is a good size for a baby. This is not what the finished quilt will look like however. There is going to be a big twist to make it special for the exceptionally special baby it is being made for. More to come!

 

13 Comments

Filed under Quilts, Tutorials

Maple Leaf Table Runner

xx

Aren’t these beautiful? My friend, Jane, made the top one and mine is on the bottom.

This is a pattern by my friend Anjeanette. You can find the tutorial on her blog here. I have been in love with this since Anjeanette showed it to me last fall. This fall she offered a class on it at our local quilt store Capital Quilts and I could not resist.

Detail

Detail of quilting and leaves

Jane was going to be visiting me from out of town at the time of the class. I sent her a picture of Anjeanette’s table runner and asked her if she wanted to come.

Anjeanette's table runner (used with permission)

Anjeanette’s table runner (used with permission)

Jane couldn’t resist it either! The leaves can be easily cut from a charm pack. Jane used a charm pack of batiks and I bought some fat quarters of Kaffe Fassett fabrics in fall colors.

My first attempt at piecing a leaf at home before the class turned out like this:

First attempt at home

First attempt at home

Yeah, not exactly square. However, I was trying to decide whether I liked the mix of fabrics sewn together in one leaf. I did decide to do each leaf in a separate fabric instead of mixing them all. Here is the leaf I did during class:

Second attempt during class

Second attempt during class (with sashing)

And here’s Janes:

xx

Anjeanette went over a lot of little details during class about piecing that helped us to get an accurate result.  These blocks, without sashing are about 5-1/2″ square. The pieces are small.

Another version by Anjeanette

Another version by Anjeanette

Luckily I wrote the tips down on the class handout, and so I still have it to refer to. And now I’m going to write it here so that it is even further embedded in my mind (and I can refer back when I’ve lost the class handout). If you are a quilter you will think I’m stating the obvious, but here goes:

1. Use a 1/4″ foot if you have one.

2. Line up a piece of colored tape to extend the 1/4″ mark forward on your sewing table so you have a much longer guide to sew against.

3. Hold the piece you are sewing all the way through the presser foot. Don’t let go right at the end. If you have to use a tool to guide it under the foot, do so.

4. Use a scrap piece of fabric as a leader before sewing your little pieces. This will keep the threads from being sucked down into the machine.

5. Each fabric piece usually has a little stretch in one direction. If you determine this ahead of time, you can often position it in such a way that the non-stretchy edge ends up on the edge instead of along the sewn line.

6. Lead with the least “pointy” part of the pieces you are sewing together. This may mean that you flip the pieces over and sew with the smaller one on the bottom. (See photos below)

7. Ironing – Set the pieces by pressing them flat first. Then open up the seam and press.  Don’t use steam.

8. Anytime you can make your pieces a little larger, sew them together, and then cut them into the exact size you need, the easier it will be to get them perfectly square.  This was the case for the kite shape that is in this block.

There are many ways to cut and sew this shape:  (and there are 6 of this shape in each leaf)

xx

It begins with a rectangle,  a square and the need to sew a diagonal line. You could mark each of these and sew on the line and then trim.

xx

But here is the easier way –

Don't mark, trim first, then sew.

Don’t mark, trim first, then sew.

Line the 1/4″ mark of your ruler on that diagonal and then trim the excess away.  This way you are ready to sew using the edge of the piece as a guide.

Here are pictures to illustrate tip #6 above regarding how to stitch this piece.

Point first! Don't do this.

Point first! Don’t do this.

That point is sure to get caught up if you try to sew it like this.

Flip it over and sew this way so that the point goes through last.

Flip it over and sew this way so that the point goes through last.

I promise that the orange piece is lined up nicely under there and sewing it this way will give you a much better result.

Once the leaves are pieced, they are bordered with sashing in different widths. I think this is what makes this table runner so special. It has movement to it because the leaves are not all lined up in a row and facing the same direction. When sewing on the sashing, always have the pieced block facing towards you so that you can see that you are sewing to the right of the leaf tips and not cutting them off.

Jane’s table runner has an extra layer of batting under the leaves in order to make them stand out a bit more.

Batting sewn and then trimmed away from back of leaf.

Batting sewn and then trimmed away from back of leaf.

Once this was done, a layer of batting was applied to the whole runner top and veins were free motion quilted on the leaves and then a stem was embroidered on.

xx

Leaf veins and stems

This was done before the backing was put on so that this stitching would not show on the back.

Now the backing was added and the piece was quilted and then the binding put on.

xx

I love the way that Jane’s (the light colored one) is framed by the dark binding and mine was bound in the background fabric so that the leaves are the whole show. This is such a good example of how the same pattern can look totally different.

Please look closely at those points.  We are so proud of them!

Here is what I ended up making from that first wonky block I made with the mix of fabrics:

Fabric "basket"

Fabric “basket”

Again, you can find Anjeanette’s tutorial for this table runner here and the homepage to her blog here. You may just want to go there to look and see what she’s up to now. This isn’t the only beautiful project that she has designed!

Addendum: Moda Bake Shop has just posted a throw size quilt by Anjeanette using the same leaf block but double the size! Find it here.

Super Sized Maple Leaf Throw byAnjeanette final picture

6 Comments

Filed under Gifts, Pattern review, Quilts, Uncategorized

Dear Jane and Dear Jim

4 of the Dear Jane quilts at the Vermont Quilt Festival

4 of the Dear Jane quilts at the Vermont Quilt Festival

Last week was my birthday and also the Vermont Quilt Festival. I live in Washington DC but we were traveling to see family in the New England area for the 4th of July holiday. When I learned that the quilt festival was taking place while we were going to be nearby, I asked my husband, Jim, if we could travel there and visit it “for my birthday”. Now really, what could he say?

My husband, Jim, at the Dear Jane exhibit. This quilt was made by Goldie Morrow of Rumney NH.

My husband, (Dear) Jim.
This quilt was made by Goldie Morrow of Rumney NH.

I had no idea before I looked through the festival booklet that there was going to be an exhibit of Dear Jane quilts. For those of you who don’t know what a Dear Jane quilt is, here is a very brief history. Jane A. Stickle from Shaftsbury, VT made the quilt below which is dated 1863. It is part of the Collection of the Bennington Museum in Vermont.

Quilt by Jane A. Stickle. From the Collection of the Bennington Museum in VT.

Quilt by Jane A. Stickle. From the Collection of the Bennington Museum in VT. Photo from the book Dear Jane

Label from Jane's quilt.  "In War Time.  1868.  Pieces 5602 Jane A. Stickle"

Label from Jane’s quilt.
In War Time.
1868.
Pieces 5602
Jane A. Stickle

In 1992 Brenda Papadakis saw a picture of this quilt and was fascinated with it. She spent the next 4 years drafting the 225 patterns and researching Jane’s life. She published her book Dear Jane in 1996 and quilters from all over the world have been making versions of it ever since.

Book by Brenda Papadakis

Book by Brenda Papadakis

I first became familiar with Dear Jane quilts by this quilt that hangs in my friend’s kitchen area. I love this quilt!

Quilt by Anne Brill of Washington, DC.

Quilt by Anne Brill of Washington, DC.

Brenda Papadakis curated the Dear Jane exhibit at this year’s Vermont Quilt festival where approximately 33 quilts hung. Click here for more information about all things “Dear Jane”.

The following are photos I took of the quilts at the exhibit. I did not photograph them all but tried to get a variety of what was shown.

Quilt by Carol Archuleta of San Ramon, CA

Quilt by Carol Archuleta of San Ramon, CA

The quilt below was started in 1999 as a class sample at The City Quilter in NYC. 14 years later their classes are still going strong. They titled their quilt “In Our Time (aka Technicolor Jane).

Made by Judy Doenias and Diane Rode Schneck of NY, NY.

Made by Judy Doenias and Diane Rode Schneck of NY, NY.

"Sunny Jane" made by Linda Pederson of Marysville, WA.

“Sunny Jane” made by Linda Pederson of Marysville, WA.

From the show program about the red and white quilt below – “This quilt was made in 2011 for Joanna Semel Rose in thanks for her exhibition, Infinite Variety: Three Centuries of Red and White Quilts.  Thirty-six quilters worked together for nine months, in time for her 81st birthday. We knew this was one quilt design she did not have in her vast collection!”

Infinite Gratitude made by Deborah Semel Bingham, NY, NY

Infinite Gratitude by Deborah Semel Bingham, NY, NY

Detail of quilt above.

Detail of quilt above.

The quilt below is titled “Kitschin Jane” as the maker wanted elements of humor, surprise and “kitsch” in her version.

Kitschin' Jane by Amy Ronis of NY, NY. She wanted elements of humor and surprise in her version.

Quilt by Amy Ronis of NY, NY.

Detail of quilt above.

Detail of quilt above.

This next quilt is the cover quilt for Brenda Papadakis’ book Dear Hannah – in the Style of Jane Stickle.

Made by Edith Shanholt of Elkhart, IN

Made by Edith Shanholt of Elkhart, IN.  Quilted by Cathy Franks.

Detail of above quilt.

Detail of above quilt.

Dear Hannah book from Amazon website

Dear Hannah book from Amazon website

I did not manage to get the number on the next 3 quilts in my photographs and can not give credit to who made them. Please contact me if you know so I can edit this post.  However, I did not want to leave these beautiful quilts out!

The first one has blocks that are set on point and has beautiful quilting throughout the “empty” space.

Lovely pastel looking version from a distance.

Very traditional  looking version from a distance.

Close-up shows a bright Kaffe Fassett print and lovely scalloped border.

Close-up shows a bright Kaffe Fassett print and lovely scalloped border.

Edited later: The quilt above is Never Say Never by Laura Fraga of San Ramon, CA

Interesting sashing and corner blocks.

Interesting sashing and corner blocks.

Edited later: The quilt above is Birthday Jane by Kerry Marksbury of San Diego, CA. Quilting friends gave her 25 blocks for her 50th birthday.

A very pretty pastel version.

A very pretty pastel version with scalloped border.

Edited later: The quilt above is Remember Me by Val Champ of Ontario, Canada. It is a tribute to all the people she lost during it’s constructions.

The next quilter says it took 15 years to finish her quilt which she has titled “Forever Jane”. It also has a beautiful scalloped border.

Forever Jane by Gay Bomers of Grand Rapids, MI.

Forever Jane by Gay Bomers of Grand Rapids, MI.

“Newfangled Jane” was made with the bright, saturated colors and large prints of Kaffe Fassett.

Newfangled Jane! by Gwen Nishida of Irvine, CA.  Quilted by Judi Madsen.

Newfangled Jane! by Gwen Nishida of Irvine, CA.
Quilted by Judi Madsen.

This next quilt was made by 225 members of the Dear Jane internet group and presented to Brenda Papadakis at the first Dear Jane Gathering at the 2000 Vermont Quilt Festival.

The Spirit of Jane Stickle. Group quilt.

The Spirit of Jane Stickle.
Group quilt.

Marbelous Jane by Claire Baker of Middlebury, IN.

Marbelous Jane by Claire Baker of Middlebury, IN.

The maker of the Marbelous Jane quilt used Kaufman’s Marbelous fabrics. This is her 5th completed Dear Jane quilt and she downsized the blocks to 3″.

Black Jane by Linda Starkey of Denver, CO.

Black Jane by Linda Starkey of Denver, CO.

Dear Jane retreats are held in Shipshewana, IN two times a year. In the Spring of 2005, 35 participants exchanged blocks made in Amish solid colors.

Shipshewana Friends Deb Kloss of Minneapolis, MN

Shipshewana Friends
Deb Kloss of Minneapolis, MN

The last quilt I have to show is a miniature Dear Jane quilt. The maker made 2″ blocks instead of the standard 4-1/2″.

Mini Jane by Barbara Larson of Chaska, MN

Mini Jane by Barbara Larson of Chaska, MN

Jim shows how small this quilt is.

Jim shows how small this quilt is.

For perspective, here he is with the quilt at the top of the page again.

Jim with the quilt made by Goldie Morrow.

Jim with the quilt made by Goldie Morrow.

Jim really was “dear” to spend the day with me at the Vermont Quilt Festival. Thank you Dear!

Other blog posts about these quilts (with more pictures) can be found here and here.

13 Comments

Filed under Quilts, Uncategorized

Quilt Top Finish

Quilt top is done!

Quilt top is done!

To find out more about the design of this quilt, please read my last post. I am making it for my married daughter and her husband and it is made from fabrics that were used as pretty fall napkins during their wedding reception.

xx

Each circle block is 20″ square

It seemed to take me forever to make those center two blocks. I strip pieced the fabrics and then laid them all out in order to make sure that I cut them right to get the alternating striped pattern that I wanted.

Not sewn together yet.

Not sewn together yet.

I was very careful to pick up each one and orient it the right way when I cut it so that it would form this pattern when I sewed it together. I did this meticulously for all 8 blocks and then I took them to the ironing board to press them, and guess what?

They all looked the same!

They all looked the same!

I felt so stupid! How did I not realize that I could have just simply laid them all out in the same direction and I would get the same pattern?

It was a breeze to sew the 12 large circle blocks together once these middle two were together. I’m really happy with the result. Here is how it looks laid out on my queen size bed – it’s only meant to be a lap quilt, but a big one!

xx

Next is making up the back. I’ve decided to simply sew the napkin squares together.  Circles on the front and squares on the back.

Napkins set out on my design wall.

Napkins set out on my design wall.

I will have to put a border around these as they are smaller than the blocks on the front. I’m in the process of trying to wash the cotton batting I am going to use to eliminate shrinkage when the finished quilt is washed. Most of the time I love that “crinkly” look when a quilt is washed for the first time. However, with this quilt having such a large design, I think it might be better if it lays more flat. If the batting survives the washing and drying process, I guess we’ll see.

xx

More wedding pictures!

xx

The groom made the photo booth. It was so much fun.

The groom made the photo booth. It was so much fun.

Both families

Both families together

It was a remarkable day and the two families have blended together perfectly. If we lived closer together (we’re in DC and they are in IL), I’m sure we would be good friends. As it is, we have great fun when we do get together.

6 Comments

Filed under Family, Quilts, Uncategorized

A Single Girl Quilt for my Married Girl?

My daughter got married to a most wonderful man on October 15, 2011.

"First look"

“First look”

As many modern couples do these days, they had pictures taken before the ceremony and so the first time he saw her in her wedding gown, they were outside instead of in the church. This wedding was on a beautiful fall day. The ceremony was in the afternoon.

throwing leaves

The reception hall was decorated (by friends and family) with fall flowers and candles.

xx

We made napkins by serging the edges of fabric to add some other fun fall color to the tables.

tableThe reception hall was a park building that had large glass windows and a stone fireplace. It felt magical, as though we were outside.

xx

When the party was over, we collected all the fabric napkins with the idea that I would make the happy couple a quilt out of them. (Yes, I washed them first!) Here they are:

All 150 of them!

All 150 of them!

I’ve had these for a year and a half now and have been trying to decide what the perfect quilt pattern would be for this couple using these colors. I’ve made several other items out of them – notebook covers and zippered pouches for family or friends who helped with the wedding.

Notebook for my mother-in-law.

Notebook for my mother-in-law.

My daughter has made her own beautiful fall colored quilt out of other fabrics since she got married.

xx

Isn’t it pretty?

xx

She had it quilted by a longarm quilter.

I’ve decided to make a “snuggle on the couch together” quilt. The pattern I have picked is the Single Girl Quilt by Denyse Schmidt.

xx

I would call it a modern version of the traditional wedding ring quilt.

Traditional Wedding Ring Quilt.

Traditional Wedding Ring Quilt.

I assume that it is called “Single Girl” because the rings do not interconnect. However, as I look at the Single Girl Quilts that others have made and posted on Flickr or Pinterest, I can see that plenty of people make them up as wedding quilts. The quilting can add that interlocking component.

My version is still a work in progress.

Blocks laid out on my rug. Middle two blocks not done yet.

Blocks laid out on my rug. Middle two blocks not done yet.

I’m going to make the center two blocks the opposite colors of the outside blocks. I will strip piece the background with the napkin fabrics and do the rings in the cream colored fabric. I love the thought of this. The middle blocks symbolize Lindsey’s and Brian’s wedding rings and they will be surrounded by circles that symbolize their families and their friends. Circles surrounded by circles. Okay, this is really dorky but “the circle of life” also comes to mind. (and with that term – The Lion King!)

So stay tuned for the big reveal once I get the other blocks made and have the whole top sewn together!

14 Comments

Filed under Family, Quilts, Uncategorized