Tag Archives: quilted table runner

Maple Leaf Table Runner

xx

Aren’t these beautiful? My friend, Jane, made the top one and mine is on the bottom.

This is a pattern by my friend Anjeanette. You can find the tutorial on her blog here. I have been in love with this since Anjeanette showed it to me last fall. This fall she offered a class on it at our local quilt store Capital Quilts and I could not resist.

Detail

Detail of quilting and leaves

Jane was going to be visiting me from out of town at the time of the class. I sent her a picture of Anjeanette’s table runner and asked her if she wanted to come.

Anjeanette's table runner (used with permission)

Anjeanette’s table runner (used with permission)

Jane couldn’t resist it either! The leaves can be easily cut from a charm pack. Jane used a charm pack of batiks and I bought some fat quarters of Kaffe Fassett fabrics in fall colors.

My first attempt at piecing a leaf at home before the class turned out like this:

First attempt at home

First attempt at home

Yeah, not exactly square. However, I was trying to decide whether I liked the mix of fabrics sewn together in one leaf. I did decide to do each leaf in a separate fabric instead of mixing them all. Here is the leaf I did during class:

Second attempt during class

Second attempt during class (with sashing)

And here’s Janes:

xx

Anjeanette went over a lot of little details during class about piecing that helped us to get an accurate result.  These blocks, without sashing are about 5-1/2″ square. The pieces are small.

Another version by Anjeanette

Another version by Anjeanette

Luckily I wrote the tips down on the class handout, and so I still have it to refer to. And now I’m going to write it here so that it is even further embedded in my mind (and I can refer back when I’ve lost the class handout). If you are a quilter you will think I’m stating the obvious, but here goes:

1. Use a 1/4″ foot if you have one.

2. Line up a piece of colored tape to extend the 1/4″ mark forward on your sewing table so you have a much longer guide to sew against.

3. Hold the piece you are sewing all the way through the presser foot. Don’t let go right at the end. If you have to use a tool to guide it under the foot, do so.

4. Use a scrap piece of fabric as a leader before sewing your little pieces. This will keep the threads from being sucked down into the machine.

5. Each fabric piece usually has a little stretch in one direction. If you determine this ahead of time, you can often position it in such a way that the non-stretchy edge ends up on the edge instead of along the sewn line.

6. Lead with the least “pointy” part of the pieces you are sewing together. This may mean that you flip the pieces over and sew with the smaller one on the bottom. (See photos below)

7. Ironing – Set the pieces by pressing them flat first. Then open up the seam and press.  Don’t use steam.

8. Anytime you can make your pieces a little larger, sew them together, and then cut them into the exact size you need, the easier it will be to get them perfectly square.  This was the case for the kite shape that is in this block.

There are many ways to cut and sew this shape:  (and there are 6 of this shape in each leaf)

xx

It begins with a rectangle,  a square and the need to sew a diagonal line. You could mark each of these and sew on the line and then trim.

xx

But here is the easier way –

Don't mark, trim first, then sew.

Don’t mark, trim first, then sew.

Line the 1/4″ mark of your ruler on that diagonal and then trim the excess away.  This way you are ready to sew using the edge of the piece as a guide.

Here are pictures to illustrate tip #6 above regarding how to stitch this piece.

Point first! Don't do this.

Point first! Don’t do this.

That point is sure to get caught up if you try to sew it like this.

Flip it over and sew this way so that the point goes through last.

Flip it over and sew this way so that the point goes through last.

I promise that the orange piece is lined up nicely under there and sewing it this way will give you a much better result.

Once the leaves are pieced, they are bordered with sashing in different widths. I think this is what makes this table runner so special. It has movement to it because the leaves are not all lined up in a row and facing the same direction. When sewing on the sashing, always have the pieced block facing towards you so that you can see that you are sewing to the right of the leaf tips and not cutting them off.

Jane’s table runner has an extra layer of batting under the leaves in order to make them stand out a bit more.

Batting sewn and then trimmed away from back of leaf.

Batting sewn and then trimmed away from back of leaf.

Once this was done, a layer of batting was applied to the whole runner top and veins were free motion quilted on the leaves and then a stem was embroidered on.

xx

Leaf veins and stems

This was done before the backing was put on so that this stitching would not show on the back.

Now the backing was added and the piece was quilted and then the binding put on.

xx

I love the way that Jane’s (the light colored one) is framed by the dark binding and mine was bound in the background fabric so that the leaves are the whole show. This is such a good example of how the same pattern can look totally different.

Please look closely at those points.  We are so proud of them!

Here is what I ended up making from that first wonky block I made with the mix of fabrics:

Fabric "basket"

Fabric “basket”

Again, you can find Anjeanette’s tutorial for this table runner here and the homepage to her blog here. You may just want to go there to look and see what she’s up to now. This isn’t the only beautiful project that she has designed!

Addendum: Moda Bake Shop has just posted a throw size quilt by Anjeanette using the same leaf block but double the size! Find it here.

Super Sized Maple Leaf Throw byAnjeanette final picture

6 Comments

Filed under Gifts, Pattern review, Quilts, Uncategorized

Table runner made from Moda Comma

IMG_1650During the December DC Modern Quilt guild meeting, there was a drawing for some Moda fabric charms and I won a  pack of “Comma”.

Moda Comma charm pack - all 42 fabrics.

Moda Comma charm pack – all 42 fabrics!

I immediately thought of my middle daughter who’s birthday is in February and who loves punctuation. She normally likes a more vintage color palette, but this will certainly look cheerful in her condo. I went to the Moda Bakeshop website and looked for a pattern using a charm pack and found this pattern by Erin Davis of Sew at Home Mummy.

xxx

120 Minute Gift – Drunkards Path Table Runner

It looked like the perfect pattern to use as sort of an oversized placemat.

IMG_1580

The pattern included templates for cutting the curves. I haven’t done a lot of curved piecing but this was not hard to do. I had to mark the centers of the curves in order to make sure they were lined up during the stitching. Instead of using a marking pen/pencil, I used the presser that my woodworking friend made for me.

xxx

Marking the middle of the curve with a “presser”.

See how well it works!

See how well it works!

The trick of sewing the pieces seemed to be to put the smaller piece on the bottom instead of on the top.

xx

Hexagon detail

After cutting the curved pieces, there was quite a bit of each fabric left over. This is why I decided to make the hexagons – which is also a favorite of my daughter. I made the hexagons in a typical English Paper Piecing way, starch and ironed them with the papers in, and then removed the paper and sewed them all by hand on to the top.

IMG_1615I quilted this by stitching in the ditch on the sewing machine around the squares. Then I used a running stitch in gray embroidery thread around the circles and in straight lines on each side of the hexagons. I had a few hexagons left over and put them on the back.

xx

Back of table runner

Here it is in her condo.

xx

Happy Birthday Sandy!

9 Comments

Filed under Gifts, Uncategorized

Donkey Table Runner

I’ve made so many Christmas gifts in the past week that I can’t blog about because the recipient reads my blog.  However, my very own sister doesn’t follow me because she “doesn’t quilt/sew”.  So shhhhhh….. if you’re related to us. Here is what I just finished for her.

Donkey Table Runner

Donkey Table Runner

She owns a miniature donkey named Albert and when I saw this fabric by Laurie Wisbrun, I knew I had to make something for her with it.

Albert.  Awww, so cute!

Albert. Awww, so cute!

She asked me to make placemats but I just wasn’t happy with how my attempts at those looked.

Placemat attempt.

Placemat attempt. (Part of this may be made into a hot pad.)

Pretty boring!

Pretty boring!

I finally decided that a table runner would be fun (and actually much less work) and I wouldn’t have to decide how many to make. So I started cutting strips and placing them on my design wall.

Strips on design wall

Strips on design wall

For some reason, despite how simple it is, I liked this much better. This became the final table runner.  The middle strip has little dogs on it that look like my sister’s Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, George.

xxx

George

George

xxx

I did a little research on what size a table runner should be compared to the size the table is. The width should be about 1/3rd the width of the table. This makes sense to me because you want to have room for your place settings on each side. This table runner is about 17″ wide and on my table it is about right. Right before I put the binding on, I asked my sister to measure her table. I didn’t hear right back from her so I proceeded to finish the binding. As luck would have it, her table is much skinnier than mine – only 36 inches.  Oh well! Maybe she can use it on her breakfast counter!

Back of table runner

Back of table runner

If she get’s tired of the donkeys, she can turn it over and have this pretty print.

Merry Christmas, Sis!

Addendum: Here it is in her kitchen:

Christmas paperwhites and amaryllis.

Christmas paperwhites, African violets and an amaryllis.

6 Comments

Filed under Family, Gifts, Uncategorized